REGISTER AN ACCOUNT
Who's Online - 5 members and 138 guests
Image
Powerlifting Advertising. Strongman Advertising.

Competition: Tell us about your favourite lift, win Protein Dynamix goodies

Users viewing topic: & 1 Guest

1234

General Bullshit is sponsored by Robert Baraban Power Products - Strong arms with handmade products.
b15ape1Icon...06-11-2015 @ 21:32 
Avatar
British bum sex champ
Member 450, 1561 posts
SQ 315, BP 212.5, DL 290
817.5 kgs @ 142kgs Eq
Wigan said:Unfortunately for me, my favourite lift was back in 1989, in a time before YouTube and smartphones, and when video cameras were scarce and mahoosive. As such my favourite lift of all time was not captured on film.

The lift itself was at the 1989 English Senior Weightlifting Championships (or The English Natives as it was called then), but the story of the lift starts in the build up.

I was 20 years old and trying to establish myself in the upper echalone of weighlifting in the UK, which at the time had a fair number of superb lifters. My build up to the English Championships was going great, training 5 times per week with a training partner as hungry for success as I was, and a better training partner you couldnt ask for (known in these parts as LittleA).

To challenge for medals at the English I knew I would need to lift weights I hadnt lifted before, and trained accordingly. Clean and Jerks were on the up and pleasingly I was routinely knocking out 160-165s in training. However, 170 was eluding me on a regular basis. I attempted 170 probably a dozen times in the last few weeks build up to the English. Usualy managing to clean it, but failing the jerk was the usual outcome. I even attempted it during an exhibition at a local summer fayre, lifting on the bandstand, where again I cleaned it but just failed the jerk. It just wouldn't go!

Fast forward to the English Championships, and I am in a tussle with two other lifters for second and third place (behind Peter May, multiple Olympian and Commonwealth Medalist). After the snatches there was nothing in it between me, Simon Davis, and Dave Sawyer. 1st and 2nd attempts were tit for tat between the three of us. I decide to sit it out and see what I need for my third attempt. My competitors finish, I have one attempt left, I am currently sat in fourth place. My choices are - 167.5 and pinch third, or 170 and jump into second. I am 20 years old and am flying high on the adrenalin of such a close battle, so obviously call for 170 (although my coach, a great man named Ray Littler had already made the decision for me), the weight that has been beating me in the build up.

I go out on the platform with no doubt that I it is going to be a battle, but one I know deep inside I can pull off. The clean doesnt go according to plan, I catch it slightly forward and have to double bounce out of the bottom. There is a hint of a forward stumble as I stand up. Is it slipping away from me? The crowd know this is a medal winning attempt and are screaming, they want to see this weight go up. I steady myself, deep breath, chest up, elbows up. Shallow dip, big drive. The bar flies up above my head, the split is good but the weight is slightly forward. It's fixed overhead, but in front of me. I recover on my front foot (I know I'll get a bollocking off my coach at some point for this), one step forward, it's stil moving, two steps forward. I can hear Ray screaming for me to hold it. It's still above head, but not yet under control, I'll not get the down signal just yet. One more shuffle and the bar is mine, I have it, it's there, I'm smiling, there are cheers, and shouts. I get the down signal. With great joy, I slam the bar to the ground, my arms are in the air. I've done it! I turn to leave the platform, and see my coach Ray charging towards me, arms in the air, face beaming, as if I had broken a world record, he wanted that lift just as much as me! He throws his arms around me and hugs me as if I've just won Olympic Gold. For me, and for Ray, that 170, on that day was our Olympic Gold, or at least it felt like it.

I walk off the platform and head backstage, still beaming, still buzzing. An older gentleman, of fairly small stature, dressed very smartly in jacket and pants, pencil moustache and slick back hair stops me. The older gentleman is Jim Halliday, or 'Jumping' Jim Halliday as he was known in his lifting days. Jim was a Japanese prisoner of war for three years in WW2, he returned from the prison camp at the end of the war malnourished and weighing about 6 stone. Three years later Jim won a weightlighting Bronze medal at the 1948 Olympics. Jim has quite a story, Google him!

As Jim approached me, he was smiling, and nodding. He took me by the hand, gave me a firm handshake, and reached up to pat me on the shoulder. "Best lift of the championship that son" he said. My day was complete!

I went on to lift more than that 170, but looking back I think it will always be my favourite lift.


Belter that Geoff
Robbo91Icon...07-11-2015 @ 08:46 
Doesn't like tall people very much.
Member 5708, 391 posts
SQ 260, BP 195, DL 275
730.0 kgs @ 137.5kgs UnEq
Now this might resemble an X-factor audition story, but bare with me.

When I was younger (17-20, I'm 24 now) I got diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Essentially I slept 16+ hours a day and had no energy during the hours I was awake. I went from being a fairly bright student and fairly decent rugby player to failing my A-levels and not being able to play anymore. I got out of shape, slept all the time and fell into a long period of depression. I worked through it and got a job at the local supermarket to keep me doing something at least and after getting a bit better, with the support of my parents and my best friend (who practically carried me through half of this) I joined the local gym.

I started to lose weight, dropping from 18 stone down to 15 and felt a lot better, then an old school style iron gym opened in my town so I joined up wanting to get stronger.

I progressed well enough, but after a year or so things started to get worse, I was sleeping more and more again and struggling with energy levels. My favourite lift comes during this period. I had a spell when I started deadlifting where I had gone from 192.5kg on my first ever attempt to 240kg within a couple of months, however as my energy levels decreased I found one session that I just couldn't seem to shift 200kg off the floor. I was a combination of upset at my failure and terrified that I was going back to how I used to be.

As I sat dejected by the bar my mentor, the owner of the gym, came over to me and gave me a talk. He told me about the Catskills, a mountain range in America, and about the Catskill Eagle. He said the Catskill eagle lives right up in the mountains and even when it takes a swoop down into the deepest darkest valley in those mountains, it is still higher than any other bird.

With that I walked over to the atlas stones, grabbed hold of the 160kg, a stone I'd never before gotten off the floor and wrestled with it a few times, it spat me out once or twice but it gave up before I did and I eventually, with a herculean effort, loaded it on the platform.

Overjoyed with this I left the gym, went to see my girlfriend and struggled not to cry with the thought that maybe I was going to be ok.

That gym is closed now, my mentor has moved on, but before he left I bought that stone off him and it sits in my garden for me to look at whenever I feel like I might be slipping into a depression again. I ended up marrying that girl, I retook my A-levels and I'm now two years into my degree.

Its a bit of a soppy one that, but it's just a little bit about why I do all of this, I consider lifting weights to have saved me and by my logic, if I go to the gym every day, then never again will there be a day when I won't be able to.
zacdavenportIconmy entry10-11-2015 @ 23:56 
Member 5921, 1 posts
SQ 120, BP 100, DL 200
420.0 kgs @ 83kgs UnEq
i had been struggling with my deadlifts for some time stuck at a training weight of 140kg. because this i got frustrated and just stuck at that weight and practised form over weight. maybe this was the worst lift ever but on the 3rd of september 2014 a mate challenged me to a mini meet in the gym for a 1 rep max on deadlifts i thought ok lets get on with it. i warmed up with 100kg deadlifts then a 3 rep set of 140kg yet again but to my amazement it felt light so i thought i'll go for 170kg for 1 it wasn't pretty but i pulled 170kg hump back style and it was a corner stone of my last 3 years of frustrated lifting its not much but im happy with it. [youtube] [/youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8h41494DeY]
unit94Icon...11-11-2015 @ 00:01 
Avatar
what is everyone's fran time?
Member 3986, 8410 posts
SQ 280, BP 200, DL 360
840.0 kgs @ 130kgs UnEq
Robbo91 said:Now this might resemble an X-factor audition story, but bare with me.

When I was younger (17-20, I'm 24 now) I got diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Essentially I slept 16+ hours a day and had no energy during the hours I was awake. I went from being a fairly bright student and fairly decent rugby player to failing my A-levels and not being able to play anymore. I got out of shape, slept all the time and fell into a long period of depression. I worked through it and got a job at the local supermarket to keep me doing something at least and after getting a bit better, with the support of my parents and my best friend (who practically carried me through half of this) I joined the local gym.

I started to lose weight, dropping from 18 stone down to 15 and felt a lot better, then an old school style iron gym opened in my town so I joined up wanting to get stronger.

I progressed well enough, but after a year or so things started to get worse, I was sleeping more and more again and struggling with energy levels. My favourite lift comes during this period. I had a spell when I started deadlifting where I had gone from 192.5kg on my first ever attempt to 240kg within a couple of months, however as my energy levels decreased I found one session that I just couldn't seem to shift 200kg off the floor. I was a combination of upset at my failure and terrified that I was going back to how I used to be.

As I sat dejected by the bar my mentor, the owner of the gym, came over to me and gave me a talk. He told me about the Catskills, a mountain range in America, and about the Catskill Eagle. He said the Catskill eagle lives right up in the mountains and even when it takes a swoop down into the deepest darkest valley in those mountains, it is still higher than any other bird.

With that I walked over to the atlas stones, grabbed hold of the 160kg, a stone I'd never before gotten off the floor and wrestled with it a few times, it spat me out once or twice but it gave up before I did and I eventually, with a herculean effort, loaded it on the platform.

Overjoyed with this I left the gym, went to see my girlfriend and struggled not to cry with the thought that maybe I was going to be ok.

That gym is closed now, my mentor has moved on, but before he left I bought that stone off him and it sits in my garden for me to look at whenever I feel like I might be slipping into a depression again. I ended up marrying that girl, I retook my A-levels and I'm now two years into my degree.

Its a bit of a soppy one that, but it's just a little bit about why I do all of this, I consider lifting weights to have saved me and by my logic, if I go to the gym every day, then never again will there be a day when I won't be able to.


I think this is my favourite one!
Robbo91Icon...11-11-2015 @ 06:55 
Doesn't like tall people very much.
Member 5708, 391 posts
SQ 260, BP 195, DL 275
730.0 kgs @ 137.5kgs UnEq
unit94 said:
I think this is my favourite one!


Thank you.
RobIcon...15-11-2015 @ 18:33 
Avatar
Does f*ck all for SugdenBarbell.co.uk
Member 1, 7164 posts
SQ 182.5, BP 110, DL 205
497.5 kgs @ 107kgs UnEq
Administrator
Just a reminder that there is a still a week left to enter this competition if you haven't already done so.

Lots of great stories so far, but room for more - top three all win prizes!
BamBam8681Icon...19-11-2015 @ 23:00 
Avatar not found
Member 5718, 103 posts
SQ 190, BP 125, DL 180
495.0 kgs @ 171kgs UnEq
Dont know if this counts but managed to get a 686kg leg press for 5 reps. Was a personal best so was well chuffed not got video but i have got pic of it.
https://instagram.com/p/-SLdNIt96I3zK1ESNBtgzIwsw_cElY0FBa0CA0/
Wayne_CowdreyIcon...24-11-2015 @ 01:09 
Avatar
Ripped anuses heal quickly in my experience
Member 400, 18018 posts
Results?
RobIcon...24-11-2015 @ 21:47 
Avatar
Does f*ck all for SugdenBarbell.co.uk
Member 1, 7164 posts
SQ 182.5, BP 110, DL 205
497.5 kgs @ 107kgs UnEq
Administrator
Thanks all who entered. Will be confirming the winners in the next few days, stay tuned! Cool
RobIcon...25-11-2015 @ 20:20 
Avatar
Does f*ck all for SugdenBarbell.co.uk
Member 1, 7164 posts
SQ 182.5, BP 110, DL 205
497.5 kgs @ 107kgs UnEq
Administrator
And the winners are....

1st Prize: Tub of Dynamo Pre-Workout, Box of Dynabars, Shaker & T-Shirt
Fatpete - 322.5kg British M2 Squat Record
VIEW ENTRY

2nd: Box of Dynabars & T-Shirt
little_a - 182.5kg Clean and Jerk PB
VIEW ENTRY

3rd: Box of Dynabars & T-Shirt
Robbo91 - Atlas Stone and Beating Depression
VIEW ENTRY

It was a tough decision and there were plenty of other entries that nearly made the list, but we felt these lifts, and the stories behind them, were really inspirational. Fatpete and little_a's lifts were both the culmination of decades of hard graft, whilst Robbo's story showed how lifting can have a really positive impact when things are tough.

Thanks to everyone for entering - and a big thank you to Jon and the team at Protein Dynamix for being good enough to supply the prizes and for being brave enough to sponsor a contest that was a little bit different and didn't just involve harvesting email addresses.

These guys have only been around for just over a year but they're really making a name for themselves, with Eddie Hall one of their main athletes - please do think about giving them a try. Their website is http://proteindynamix.com

If the prize-winners could please PM me your address and t-shirt size, Protein Dynamix will get your prizes in the post.
Wayne_CowdreyIcon...25-11-2015 @ 21:01 
Avatar
Ripped anuses heal quickly in my experience
Member 400, 18018 posts
Congrats to the winners Happy
Robbo91Icon...25-11-2015 @ 21:25 
Doesn't like tall people very much.
Member 5708, 391 posts
SQ 260, BP 195, DL 275
730.0 kgs @ 137.5kgs UnEq
It's a privilege to have my story recognised alongside some of the great lifters on this site.
Thank you very much.
WiegieboardIcon...25-11-2015 @ 22:27 
Avatar
as crimson as my last victims underclothing.....
Member 899, 10595 posts
SQ 160, BP 112.5, DL 190
462.5 kgs @ 93kgs UnEq
little_a said:Not sure if it's my best, but it was probably my best lift on Sugden.

After training with Al at Adlington and getting caught up in ongoing conversation it transpired that we both had PB clean and Jerks of 175, but with Al refusing
to go metric in the early 70's this figure was annoyingly shy of the milestone of 400lb. As I was around 37YO at the time it seemed that that was that,
although Al did keep turning over the soil and sowing the seeds. I had a good run of training and with my old training partner Jeff Wiggers Williams
training with me set for set, lb for lb I had close company, and around me at Adlington a growing number of hard core trainers from locally and from
further afield boosted in no small part by Sugden BB forum. We had Mark Felix pulling 400k's, Ste Leigh benching 230's, Fat Pete, BOAR, Rob, TONY, Millsy
and a whole load more who Al was beasting to PB after PB. Everything was in place, bar one thing. I was too old to get Olympic lift PB's.
In 2007 (I think) Al staged a 50th anniversary for the gym and had myself, Wigan, Ste leigh and Fat Pete give a demonstration of lifts in front of past
and present members, and in front of this crowd I managed a 177PB, a new club record. It was time to try the 400. After a good clean the jerk was short
and forward, and not to be. Time ticked on and the atmosphere kept me going. It was great to be a part of it. At several Adlington 'training' meets I
had other good goes, all close but no cigar. The 5k I needed to nail was a constant infinity away and approaching 39YO wasn't conducive to PBs. After another
good run of training I remember one particular Monday night I finished training then calmly told Al I was going to do the 400 next Monday. It was like a switch had
been flipped and for the next week the thought of that one lift consumed me, helped along by all the Sugden members who kept popping up on MSN (remember that?)
reminding me that Monday was getting closer.
Monday night came around and Adlington was buzzing as it was in those days. People getting stuck in as usual and Al was really angry. The way he used to get when he thought one of his lads
was going to sell himself short. I had a good warm up with the bar and before I knew it was at 150. During my last 2 warm ups with 162 & 172 no one else
lifted in the gym. When I loaded 182 there wasn't a person present who wanted to see anything other than a good lift and I felt all the atmosphere of a
major championships.


Al told me straight after that he'd seen me do better, and he probably had. It wasn't great, but it was 400lb. I had good goes at 185, 187, 190 but never
surpassed this weight and as it does time caught me up. This forum exploded at the same time as many of us found Adlington and more importantly found
Alan Fairclough. Anyone who was there knows what I mean. They were magical times with magical people and I was there with them.


Absolutely outstanding post.
ProteinDynamixIcon...26-11-2015 @ 08:49 
Avatar
Member 5872, 3 posts
Rob said:And the winners are....

1st Prize: Tub of Dynamo Pre-Workout, Box of Dynabars, Shaker & T-Shirt
Fatpete - 322.5kg British M2 Squat Record
VIEW ENTRY

2nd: Box of Dynabars & T-Shirt
little_a - 182.5kg Clean and Jerk PB
VIEW ENTRY

3rd: Box of Dynabars & T-Shirt
Robbo91 - Atlas Stone and Beating Depression
VIEW ENTRY

It was a tough decision and there were plenty of other entries that nearly made the list, but we felt these lifts, and the stories behind them, were really inspirational. Fatpete and little_a's lifts were both the culmination of decades of hard graft, whilst Robbo's story showed how lifting can have a really positive impact when things are tough.

Thanks to everyone for entering - and a big thank you to Jon and the team at Protein Dynamix for being good enough to supply the prizes and for being brave enough to sponsor a contest that was a little bit different and didn't just involve harvesting email addresses.

These guys have only been around for just over a year but they're really making a name for themselves, with Eddie Hall one of their main athletes - please do think about giving them a try. Their website is http://proteindynamix.com

If the prize-winners could please PM me your address and t-shirt size, Protein Dynamix will get your prizes in the post.


Great competition Rob and a pleasure to provide the prizes for the winning posts!

We hope the guy's enjoy the products and look forward to our continuing support of Sugden!
little_aIcon...26-11-2015 @ 09:51 
Avatar
still a devious weightlifting bastard
Member 43, 14084 posts
Wiegieboard said:
Absolutely outstanding post.


Thanks Wiegie, and whoever voted for me using whatever criteria. Happy to be mentioned in the same light as the other guys in the thread, and a big congratulations to Pete for a just win. I was there that day and it was both a stand out moment in Pete's life and a great lift in itself.
I've been fortunate enough to have two coaches in my life who did their best to steer me and to protect me, often from myself, as well as getting the best out of me. Neither are still with us, but both are mentioned in this thread. It means a lot. Thank you.

1234

© Sugden Barbell 2017 - Mobile Version - Privacy - Terms & Conditions - Website by Devto