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General_illIcon...02-11-2015 @ 21:28 
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3rd place Europes strongest man 2016 U90kg
Member 1239, 13182 posts
SQ 255, BP 155, DL 295.4
705.4 kgs @ 89kgs Eq
For me it's gotta be 2 lifts. 1st is my 140kg log from a week before Britans strongest man. I choose this as I'd been stuck at 125kg for years I'd managed to fluke a 130kg at the scl comp in Portsmouth but couldn't regularly manage more than 125, I've put in quite a lot of work on log this year which culminated in the 140



The second lift I've gotta add was my 510kg 18/19inch world record deadlift from Britain's Strongest man.

This is the full comp video (skip to 4:10 for the deadlift)


Also I knocked my dads teeth out when he hugged me after this lift. Lol cost him 300 for a new fake one

Thanks.
little_aIcon...02-11-2015 @ 21:47 
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still a devious weightlifting bastard
Member 43, 14110 posts
Not sure if it's my best, but it was probably my best lift on Sugden.

After training with Al at Adlington and getting caught up in ongoing conversation it transpired that we both had PB clean and Jerks of 175, but with Al refusing
to go metric in the early 70's this figure was annoyingly shy of the milestone of 400lb. As I was around 37YO at the time it seemed that that was that,
although Al did keep turning over the soil and sowing the seeds. I had a good run of training and with my old training partner Jeff Wiggers Williams
training with me set for set, lb for lb I had close company, and around me at Adlington a growing number of hard core trainers from locally and from
further afield boosted in no small part by Sugden BB forum. We had Mark Felix pulling 400k's, Ste Leigh benching 230's, Fat Pete, BOAR, Rob, TONY, Millsy
and a whole load more who Al was beasting to PB after PB. Everything was in place, bar one thing. I was too old to get Olympic lift PB's.
In 2007 (I think) Al staged a 50th anniversary for the gym and had myself, Wigan, Ste leigh and Fat Pete give a demonstration of lifts in front of past
and present members, and in front of this crowd I managed a 177PB, a new club record. It was time to try the 400. After a good clean the jerk was short
and forward, and not to be. Time ticked on and the atmosphere kept me going. It was great to be a part of it. At several Adlington 'training' meets I
had other good goes, all close but no cigar. The 5k I needed to nail was a constant infinity away and approaching 39YO wasn't conducive to PBs. After another
good run of training I remember one particular Monday night I finished training then calmly told Al I was going to do the 400 next Monday. It was like a switch had
been flipped and for the next week the thought of that one lift consumed me, helped along by all the Sugden members who kept popping up on MSN (remember that?)
reminding me that Monday was getting closer.
Monday night came around and Adlington was buzzing as it was in those days. People getting stuck in as usual and Al was really angry. The way he used to get when he thought one of his lads
was going to sell himself short. I had a good warm up with the bar and before I knew it was at 150. During my last 2 warm ups with 162 & 172 no one else
lifted in the gym. When I loaded 182 there wasn't a person present who wanted to see anything other than a good lift and I felt all the atmosphere of a
major championships.


Al told me straight after that he'd seen me do better, and he probably had. It wasn't great, but it was 400lb. I had good goes at 185, 187, 190 but never
surpassed this weight and as it does time caught me up. This forum exploded at the same time as many of us found Adlington and more importantly found
Alan Fairclough. Anyone who was there knows what I mean. They were magical times with magical people and I was there with them.
FatpeteIcon...02-11-2015 @ 21:48 
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I have been targeted by the NHS for bowel cancer
Member 70, 13154 posts
SQ 322.5, BP 205, DL 300
827.5 kgs @ 133kgs Eq
Post Edited: 02.11.2015 @ 21:52 PM by Fatpete



Early December 2007, I was back at Rhino's in Oldham to defend my North West title. I started lifting aged 23, I first competed at Powerlifting aged 50. Alan Fairclough coached me and encouraged me as I was masters 2, he knew the records and he knew what he could get me to do. December 2006 I entered and won my first North Wests, the following April I won my first British, that December Alan wanted the British masters2 125+ British squat record. It stood at 320 kilos held by a very fine lifter named Dave Turner, He had taken it from, Alan told me, a chap called Andy Kerr. These are serious lifters Alan assured me, career lifters, this is no soft record, it's serious, it's well worth having. "You have to get it for me" he told me.
In training Alan had me do 317.5 several times but then we always backed away, save it for the platform, he said. For when it matters.
The day came, the warmup room at Rhinos was horrible, it was in the cellar with a sloping floor and no rack option for the "racks-in" lifter. I nearly lost a thumb in that warm up room, but I didn't.
The comp was very well attended, Boar, Little A, Handsome Jeff, Joe the terrible and Tony Raw amongst others, Tony greeted me with a handshake and informed me "I have driven two hundred miles and passed up half a grand's worth of work to see this, so don't let me down"
From memory I open on 290, then 310 then 322.5. I could have picked 321 but neither Alan nor I wanted any truck with one kilo increments. If it was doing to get done it as going to get done right.
Joe kept an eye on things, telling me when to start wrapping, putting my straps up and walking me out to the platform in good time and whispering encouragement in my ear.
"bar's loaded" said the MC and I stepped forward. A few extra spotters joined us.
I ducked under the bar and nestled it into my sweet spot, took the strain and stood and walked back a couple of paces. I fixed my eyes on Barrie Nelson who was centre reffing that day and set myself.
"Squat" said the man and lowered his arm.
I took a deep breath and broke at the knees and sunk down, down, seemingly into the very bowels of the earth. If I fail this on depth Alan will kill me. I sink as low as I dare then dig, using the wraps and the suit and start the ascent, half way up things got serious, they got very slow, and a bit shaky, at this point Tony's words about half a grands worth of work came back to me. It helped, it really did. I pushed through the sticking point and things got easier with every inch, then I was up, up and I'd done it. However there are technicalities to be considered, keep the feet still and stand waiting for the ref. I look at him and he looked at me, it was probably only a second but it seemed like ten, and the bar was getting heavier all the time. "Rack" said the ref and I was helped back in by the spotters. I have never been so happy.
The first bench took some of the pressure off, and the first deadlift sealed it. I had a total, the record would stand. It stands yet.
I don't remember much about the other lifts nor indeed about the rest of the day. I do remember that I had my hand shaken about a hundred times and enjoyed everyone of them.

Was it the best day of my life ? Possibly, it is certainly up there. In fact, it probably was.

Thank you for your attention
RobIcon...02-11-2015 @ 22:38 
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Does f*ck all for SugdenBarbell.co.uk
Member 1, 7165 posts
SQ 182.5, BP 110, DL 205
497.5 kgs @ 107kgs UnEq
Administrator
Some cracking entries already, it's going to be hard to judge!

I remember taking the video of your lift Andy; glad I let the camera roll - nice to capture some old-school Alan banter!

Also remember being present at Rhinos' for Pete's lift - it was packed and the atmosphere was terrific, what a lift to end the day on.
ProteinDynamixIcon...03-11-2015 @ 09:00 
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Member 5872, 3 posts
Rob said:Some cracking entries already, it's going to be hard to judge!

I remember taking the video of your lift Andy; glad I let the camera roll - nice to capture some old-school Alan banter!

Also remember being present at Rhinos' for Pete's lift - it was packed and the atmosphere was terrific, what a lift to end the day on.


Couldn't agree more Rob!

Looks like this is going to be a fantastic competition and a real tough one to pick a winner. Keep the entries coming guys.
jones105Iconmy squats03-11-2015 @ 15:08 
most definatley not an idiot
Member 2731, 2563 posts
SQ 260, BP 170, DL 300
730.0 kgs @ 92kgs UnEq
For me,i cannot pick one so I'm going for two..first one is my PB beltless front squat PB 215kg...two weeks before this lift I tore my bicep distal tendon.really wanted to nail 220kg before that yr was out but knew with this injury that it was unlikely...so woke up morning before my op and said balls to it.lets go attempt a PB before my op...my arm felt fine tbh.i hit 200,210,215 and was happy with that!



Second lift was nearly 2 years in the making lol...had an ankle injury in 2012 and it knocked my confidence for back squats...concentrated on fronties as they felt more comfortable...
Got a wild card invite to Brits u90s which had 220kg squat for reps so needed to pull my finger out and work on it.luckily enough I did start a few weeks before...at Brits I won the event with 9 reps so thought there's gota be a PB there!!
My previous was 245kg in 2012..had a few days rest and went for it with the aim to get 250kg..got it easy so attempted 260kg(video) nailed.only with I had gone a few kgs more....
Was over the moon with this lift,confidence was back!

Wayne_CowdreyIcon...04-11-2015 @ 16:11 
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Ripped anuses heal quickly in my experience
Member 400, 18517 posts
Let's have something a bit... different Grin

Although I'm fond of my 108kg strict press without a warm-up that caused uproar on Sugden, I'm going for this display of strength combined with oddness...



Back injury/troubles prompted me to explore 'alternative' exercises. Fell in love with zerchers. Conceived "THE ZERCHER CLUB" on Sugden, which attracted a minority following. 217kg was the heaviest I got to.

Happy
jones105Icon........04-11-2015 @ 20:35 
most definatley not an idiot
Member 2731, 2563 posts
SQ 260, BP 170, DL 300
730.0 kgs @ 92kgs UnEq
The_Lone_WolfIcon...04-11-2015 @ 20:52 
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I eat a lot of meat
Member 5124, 2321 posts
SQ 245, BP 130, DL 275
650.0 kgs @ 105kgs UnEq
Wayne_Cowdrey said:Let's have something a bit... different Grin

Although I'm fond of my 108kg strict press without a warm-up that caused uproar on Sugden, I'm going for this display of strength combined with oddness...



Back injury/troubles prompted me to explore 'alternative' exercises. Fell in love with zerchers. Conceived "THE ZERCHER CLUB" on Sugden, which attracted a minority following. 217kg was the heaviest I got to.

Happy



I like this lift for 3 reasons.

1) The plates on the bar.

2) The grunt.

3) The insulina dripping from you.
Wayne_CowdreyIcon...04-11-2015 @ 22:46 
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Ripped anuses heal quickly in my experience
Member 400, 18517 posts
Loal Happy
edi86Icon...05-11-2015 @ 18:06 
Member 5548, 390 posts
SQ 235, BP 150, DL 290
675.0 kgs @ 105kgs UnEq
Wow mind blowing stuff Wayne fair play!
Wayne_CowdreyIcon...06-11-2015 @ 14:19 
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Ripped anuses heal quickly in my experience
Member 400, 18517 posts
Thanks Grin

I might start doing these again when my injured ribs are sorted.
WiganIcon...06-11-2015 @ 15:01 
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a cynical old scrote
Member 68, 6333 posts
SQ 255, BP 132.5, DL 250
637.5 kgs @ 110kgs UnEq
Unfortunately for me, my favourite lift was back in 1989, in a time before YouTube and smartphones, and when video cameras were scarce and mahoosive. As such my favourite lift of all time was not captured on film.

The lift itself was at the 1989 English Senior Weightlifting Championships (or The English Natives as it was called then), but the story of the lift starts in the build up.

I was 20 years old and trying to establish myself in the upper echalone of weighlifting in the UK, which at the time had a fair number of superb lifters. My build up to the English Championships was going great, training 5 times per week with a training partner as hungry for success as I was, and a better training partner you couldnt ask for (known in these parts as LittleA).

To challenge for medals at the English I knew I would need to lift weights I hadnt lifted before, and trained accordingly. Clean and Jerks were on the up and pleasingly I was routinely knocking out 160-165s in training. However, 170 was eluding me on a regular basis. I attempted 170 probably a dozen times in the last few weeks build up to the English. Usualy managing to clean it, but failing the jerk was the usual outcome. I even attempted it during an exhibition at a local summer fayre, lifting on the bandstand, where again I cleaned it but just failed the jerk. It just wouldn't go!

Fast forward to the English Championships, and I am in a tussle with two other lifters for second and third place (behind Peter May, multiple Olympian and Commonwealth Medalist). After the snatches there was nothing in it between me, Simon Davis, and Dave Sawyer. 1st and 2nd attempts were tit for tat between the three of us. I decide to sit it out and see what I need for my third attempt. My competitors finish, I have one attempt left, I am currently sat in fourth place. My choices are - 167.5 and pinch third, or 170 and jump into second. I am 20 years old and am flying high on the adrenalin of such a close battle, so obviously call for 170 (although my coach, a great man named Ray Littler had already made the decision for me), the weight that has been beating me in the build up.

I go out on the platform with no doubt that I it is going to be a battle, but one I know deep inside I can pull off. The clean doesnt go according to plan, I catch it slightly forward and have to double bounce out of the bottom. There is a hint of a forward stumble as I stand up. Is it slipping away from me? The crowd know this is a medal winning attempt and are screaming, they want to see this weight go up. I steady myself, deep breath, chest up, elbows up. Shallow dip, big drive. The bar flies up above my head, the split is good but the weight is slightly forward. It's fixed overhead, but in front of me. I recover on my front foot (I know I'll get a bollocking off my coach at some point for this), one step forward, it's stil moving, two steps forward. I can hear Ray screaming for me to hold it. It's still above head, but not yet under control, I'll not get the down signal just yet. One more shuffle and the bar is mine, I have it, it's there, I'm smiling, there are cheers, and shouts. I get the down signal. With great joy, I slam the bar to the ground, my arms are in the air. I've done it! I turn to leave the platform, and see my coach Ray charging towards me, arms in the air, face beaming, as if I had broken a world record, he wanted that lift just as much as me! He throws his arms around me and hugs me as if I've just won Olympic Gold. For me, and for Ray, that 170, on that day was our Olympic Gold, or at least it felt like it.

I walk off the platform and head backstage, still beaming, still buzzing. An older gentleman, of fairly small stature, dressed very smartly in jacket and pants, pencil moustache and slick back hair stops me. The older gentleman is Jim Halliday, or 'Jumping' Jim Halliday as he was known in his lifting days. Jim was a Japanese prisoner of war for three years in WW2, he returned from the prison camp at the end of the war malnourished and weighing about 6 stone. Three years later Jim won a weightlighting Bronze medal at the 1948 Olympics. Jim has quite a story, Google him!

As Jim approached me, he was smiling, and nodding. He took me by the hand, gave me a firm handshake, and reached up to pat me on the shoulder. "Best lift of the championship that son" he said. My day was complete!

I went on to lift more than that 170, but looking back I think it will always be my favourite lift.
slimsimIcon...06-11-2015 @ 17:04 
My asshole is not watertight.
Member 2926, 5611 posts
SQ 215, BP 125, DL 250
590.0 kgs @ 86kgs UnEq
Wigan said:Unfortunately for me, my favourite lift was back in 1989, in a time before YouTube and smartphones, and when video cameras were scarce and mahoosive. As such my favourite lift of all time was not captured on film.

The lift itself was at the 1989 English Senior Weightlifting Championships (or The English Natives as it was called then), but the story of the lift starts in the build up.

I was 20 years old and trying to establish myself in the upper echalone of weighlifting in the UK, which at the time had a fair number of superb lifters. My build up to the English Championships was going great, training 5 times per week with a training partner as hungry for success as I was, and a better training partner you couldnt ask for (known in these parts as LittleA).

To challenge for medals at the English I knew I would need to lift weights I hadnt lifted before, and trained accordingly. Clean and Jerks were on the up and pleasingly I was routinely knocking out 160-165s in training. However, 170 was eluding me on a regular basis. I attempted 170 probably a dozen times in the last few weeks build up to the English. Usualy managing to clean it, but failing the jerk was the usual outcome. I even attempted it during an exhibition at a local summer fayre, lifting on the bandstand, where again I cleaned it but just failed the jerk. It just wouldn't go!

Fast forward to the English Championships, and I am in a tussle with two other lifters for second and third place (behind Peter May, multiple Olympian and Commonwealth Medalist). After the snatches there was nothing in it between me, Simon Davis, and Dave Sawyer. 1st and 2nd attempts were tit for tat between the three of us. I decide to sit it out and see what I need for my third attempt. My competitors finish, I have one attempt left, I am currently sat in fourth place. My choices are - 167.5 and pinch third, or 170 and jump into second. I am 20 years old and am flying high on the adrenalin of such a close battle, so obviously call for 170 (although my coach, a great man named Ray Littler had already made the decision for me), the weight that has been beating me in the build up.

I go out on the platform with no doubt that I it is going to be a battle, but one I know deep inside I can pull off. The clean doesnt go according to plan, I catch it slightly forward and have to double bounce out of the bottom. There is a hint of a forward stumble as I stand up. Is it slipping away from me? The crowd know this is a medal winning attempt and are screaming, they want to see this weight go up. I steady myself, deep breath, chest up, elbows up. Shallow dip, big drive. The bar flies up above my head, the split is good but the weight is slightly forward. It's fixed overhead, but in front of me. I recover on my front foot (I know I'll get a bollocking off my coach at some point for this), one step forward, it's stil moving, two steps forward. I can hear Ray screaming for me to hold it. It's still above head, but not yet under control, I'll not get the down signal just yet. One more shuffle and the bar is mine, I have it, it's there, I'm smiling, there are cheers, and shouts. I get the down signal. With great joy, I slam the bar to the ground, my arms are in the air. I've done it! I turn to leave the platform, and see my coach Ray charging towards me, arms in the air, face beaming, as if I had broken a world record, he wanted that lift just as much as me! He throws his arms around me and hugs me as if I've just won Olympic Gold. For me, and for Ray, that 170, on that day was our Olympic Gold, or at least it felt like it.

I walk off the platform and head backstage, still beaming, still buzzing. An older gentleman, of fairly small stature, dressed very smartly in jacket and pants, pencil moustache and slick back hair stops me. The older gentleman is Jim Halliday, or 'Jumping' Jim Halliday as he was known in his lifting days. Jim was a Japanese prisoner of war for three years in WW2, he returned from the prison camp at the end of the war malnourished and weighing about 6 stone. Three years later Jim won a weightlighting Bronze medal at the 1948 Olympics. Jim has quite a story, Google him!

As Jim approached me, he was smiling, and nodding. He took me by the hand, gave me a firm handshake, and reached up to pat me on the shoulder. "Best lift of the championship that son" he said. My day was complete!

I went on to lift more than that 170, but looking back I think it will always be my favourite lift.


That's a great story! I was holding my breath at times.
EDCLARKEIcon...06-11-2015 @ 20:53 
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Sugdens 2nd fastest spastic.
Member 85, 9946 posts
SQ 170, BP 130, DL 260
560.0 kgs @ 90kgs UnEq
some great stories here , i've enjoyed reading this thread

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